Trigger (Un)Happy

When finding myself in the midst of particular difficult period I often get asked ‘what triggered it this time?’ This is a perfectly legitimate question, and one that a non-sufferer would be completely justified in asking. Of course there are some obvious triggers, such as big life events like bereavements or breakups, that are bound to cause a whirlwind of emotions and a downward spiral into depression. However, for the majority of the time there are no rational or tangible triggers that precipitate the relapse; instead it appears out of the blue, like a bullet train rocketing out of a tunnel. In some instances it builds up gradually before it reaching its painful crescendo, but on other occasions it hits you full pelt in the stomach, with no warning or let up.

According to this the article Top Relapse Triggers for Depression & How to Prevent Them “the risk of recurrence — ‘relapse after full remission’ — for a person who’s had one episode of depression is 50 percent. For a person with two episodes, the risk is about 70 percent. For someone with three episodes or more, the risk rises to around 90 percent”. That statistic doesn’t provide much comfort, as clearly the chances of relapse increase with each depressive episode that occurs. Putting it bluntly, things will only get worse.

The article proceeds to suggest 3 potential trigger categories, and how they can manifest into a period of depression:

Not Following Treatment

The article proposes that “The biggest issue regarding relapse has to do with children and adults not following through on their treatment plan… this includes anything from skipping therapy sessions to missing doses of your medication to ending therapy too soon”. I can certainly relate to the negative effects of ending therapy too soon, although through no fault of my own, but rather the underfunded and oversubscribed NHS. If these support structures are not strong enough, or are fragmented and disturbed, then it undeniably ensures that a relapse is increasingly likely. The article also suggests that “while your life may involve psychotherapy, medication and the need for a protective structure that keeps your illness at bay, also realize that you have passions, desires, gifts and talents that require just as much attention.” It is all to easy for these facets of life to fall by the wayside, which consequently prolongs the negative cycle.

Ruminations

“Negative self-referential ruminations play a key role in recurrence… for example, individuals with depression tend to dwell on their (supposed) flaws and failures. They also may view neutral events with a negative lens.” Ruminations are a big deal for me, allowing my mind to dwell on my insecurities, and conjure up thoughts of sadness, hopelessness and a misguided longing for a perceived better life. This trigger is particularly problematic to tackle, as the thoughts come out of the blue, and linger sometimes for days or weeks. Unfortunately the mind cannot be switched off, and the more time you spend alone, the more the thoughts penetrate deep into the brain, eating away at you, with little or no regards to the consequences. Despite being a cliché, it’s like being trapped inside a prison, with only your thoughts as the ruthless prison guards for company.

Knowing Your Personal Vulnerabilities

“Triggers may be very specific to each individual’s situation, since all of our emotional responses are unique to some extent…learn how to recognize the who, what, whys and whens of your emotional and physical life.” For example particular dates or times of the year can prove to be difficult and act as triggers for a depressive state of mind. For me personally my birthday and Christmas are particularly troublesome as they can provoke the ruminations mentioned previously, and cause them to take hold, whilst also proliferating ideas of another year having passed by and another year when I still feel trapped in a deep well of unhappiness. Regret, frustration and sadness are emotions that become second nature. The article also notes that “If you find yourself excessively fatigued, irritable, having trouble eating or sleeping, you might be in the midst of a trigger event.”

Identifying certain triggers doesn’t really provide much assistance or solace. I sometimes have anticipated an event 8 months in advance as a potential cause of anxiety or depression, and despite this warning, it plays out exactly as I had envisioned. Plus the fact that there are so many invisible and intangible triggers at play ensures that any attempt to fight the process becomes virtually impossible. The article concludes that you “don’t measure your success living with depression on whether relapse happens or not. Instead, realize that if relapse occurs, true success comes from rising after the fall…Fall down seven times, get up eight.” The difficulty comes in the fact that falling down is so easy, but getting back up again requires reserves of energy and determination that are in very short supply.

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